Categories Articles Interviews Photoshoots

Saoirse talks to The Wall Street Journal

Saoirse talks to The Wall Street Journal

Saoirse talked to The Wall Street Journal in order to promote “Mary Queen of Scots”! Two images were released with the article, and they were added to our photo gallery. You can read the complete text below.

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Saoirse Ronan Would Rather Be Knitting
The ascendant star, now playing ‘Mary Queen of Scots,’ prefers to spend her off-time out of the limelight—and get through the grocery store incognito

With star turns in last year’s “Lady Bird” and the new period epic “Mary Queen of Scots,” out Dec. 7, the Irish actress Saoirse Ronan has catapulted into Hollywood’s top ranks. But she prefers to spend her off time out of the limelight: The 24-year-old’s favorite pastimes include knitting, cooking and reading history. “I don’t go to a lot of clubs because I’m busy knitting,” she jokes. “I just knit and read history books.” She laughs and shakes her head, adding, “Now nobody will want to read this interview.”

Ms. Ronan’s interest in history won’t come as a surprise to those who have followed her career. Her breakout role, as a teen whose lie wreaks havoc in “Atonement” (2007), was set largely in 1930s and ’40s England. In “Brooklyn” (2015), she played an Irish immigrant in 1950s New York who’s pulled between her homeland and her new life. She’s now filming “Little Women,” playing Jo March in the movie based on Louisa May Alcott’s 19th-century classic.

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Categories Interviews Photoshoots

Saoirse & Margot Robbie talk to the NY Times

Saoirse & Margot Robbie talk to the NY Times

A new interview with Saoirse and her “Mary Queen of Scots” co-star Margot Robbie has been published by The New York Times! The portrait released with it has been added to our gallery, and you can read the article below.

Saoirse Ronan and Margot Robbie Are Coming Into Their Power
The “Mary Queen of Scots” stars and former Oscar rivals are tired of being people-pleasers. “There’s a lot of power in saying no,” says Robbie.

When Josie Rourke made her pitch to direct “Mary Queen of Scots,” about the royal rivalry between the Scottish ruler Mary Stuart and the English Queen Elizabeth I, she suggested thinking of the movie as a renaissance version of “Heat.” Like that thriller, which cast Al Pacino and Robert De Niro on opposite sides of the law, “what the film needed was a really great scene for two women to play opposite each other,” Rourke said.

Much of “Mary Queen of Scots” (due Friday) builds to that moment when Mary and Elizabeth finally meet — a cinematic flourish, as historians believe the two communicated only by letter. The film’s scene is the sort of centerpiece that only works if you know the women playing it are formidably matched equals offscreen, too. In casting Margot Robbie as Elizabeth opposite Saoirse Ronan’s Mary, Rourke found a pair so well-matched that they even competed against each other for last season’s best actress Oscar.

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Categories Interviews Photoshoots

The LA Times talks about “Mary Queen of Scots”

The LA Times talks about “Mary Queen of Scots”

A new article about “Mary Queen of Scots” has been released by the Los Angeles Times! Saoirse, Margot Robbie and director Josie Rourke discussed the movie with Jen Yamato and posed for a couple of portraits, which have been added to our photo gallery.

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From the moment she became queen of Scotland at 6 days old, the world never stopped scrutinizing Mary Stuart’s every move — or pitting her against Elizabeth I of England, the cousin whose throne she held a claim to by birth.

Executed at the age of 44, implicated in a plot to assassinate Elizabeth that historians debate to this day, it was her enemies who would write Mary’s legacy. So in the turbulent years of her controversial life, contemporaries wonder, who was the real woman known as Mary, Queen of Scots, and what led to her tragic undoing?

Put another way in director Josie Rourke’s forceful new biopic, “Mary Queen of Scots”: What if Mary and Elizabeth could’ve just sat down together and worked things out?

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Categories Award Shows Photoshoots

(Photos) “Mary Queen of Scots” Press Conference

(Photos) “Mary Queen of Scots” Press Conference

Saoirse attended a press conference for “Mary Queen of Scots” in West Hollywood yesterday! Our gallery has been updated with portraits taken at the event, as well as photos of her at the Governors Awards.

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Categories Mary Queen of Scots Photoshoots

“Mary, Queen of Scots” Poster + Promotional

“Mary, Queen of Scots” Poster + Promotional

A new poster for Mary, Queen of Scots featuring Saoirse and Margot Robbie has been released! We have added it to our photo gallery, as well as two promotional images of Saoirse as Queen Mary Stuart – one of which seems to be part of the movie’s official photoshoot. The other is a better quality version of a still we had added before.

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Categories Articles Magazine Scans Photoshoots

Saoirse covers Vogue

Saoirse covers Vogue

Saoirse is on the August cover of VOGUE! This marks the beginning of the promotion for the film Mary, Queen of Scots, one most of us have been waiting for literally years. A brand new, stunning photoshoot by Jamie Hawkesworth was released along with the article on the magazine’s website. The images have been added to our gallery, and you can read Saoirse’s cover story below.

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Saoirse Ronan is describing the aftermath of her first acting job. “I went into this melancholic state for a few weeks,” she tells me. “I remember sitting on the bed with Mam next to me, and I was like: ‘I’m never going to have that experience again.’ ” The community that had come together on set and developed real bonds had now permanently dispersed. “It was that thought: That exact crew will never work together again. Never.” The project was an Irish television drama called The Clinic. When she appeared on it, Ronan was nine years old.

Now 24, Ronan has come to meet me in a coastal Irish town on a sunny afternoon in May. Ireland is facing a referendum to repeal its ban on abortion, and lurid posters of fetuses are everywhere. Ronan recently appeared in a video supporting the reproductive rights campaign—a long-growing grassroots movement that finally succeeded in pressuring the government to hold a referendum—and everyone is talking about it. In the café where we pick up lunch, we fall into conversation with our server about the upcoming vote.

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Categories Photoshoots

Gallery Additions: New Portraits for The Times and Spur Magazine

Gallery Additions: New Portraits for The Times and Spur Magazine

Thanks to WIBAgency.com, we have updated the gallery with new portraits of Saoirse for Spur Magazine (Japan). In addition, we’ve added new ones from The Times photoshoot released a week ago.

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Categories Interviews Photoshoots

Saoirse and Ian McEwan talk to The Times

Saoirse and Ian McEwan talk to The Times

Saoirse and Ian McEwan have given an interview to The Times! You need to register to their website in order to read everything, but we have a snippet below. A new picture has been released with it, and we’ve added it to our gallery (you can view it here).

The actress and the novelist, it quickly becomes clear, are each other’s best audiences. Saoirse Ronan tells Ian McEwan that when reading his novels she is always struck by his “incredible understanding of the mind of a woman”. McEwan, for his part, says she has “a wonderful ability” to convey what his characters are thinking without even speaking.

Having embraced delightedly, the pair are in a Soho hotel room talking about his new adaptation of his 2007 novel On Chesil Beach, in which she stars. They have known each since Saoirse (pronounced “Sursha”) played Briony in the film of his Atonement in 2007. She was just 13 yet was nominated for a best supporting actress Oscar.

Read more here.

Categories Interviews On Chesil Beach Photoshoots

(Photo) “On Chesil Beach” featured in Vanity Fair

(Photo) “On Chesil Beach” featured in Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair recently had a feature on ‘On Chesil Beach’ along with a new portrait of Saoirse and Billy Howle. You can view it right in our gallery.

With On Chesil Beach, which will be in theaters next month, Saoirse Ronan sustains an unbroken streak of acting excellence that has encompassed The Grand Budapest Hotel, Brooklyn, and Lady Bird. The film is set in the narrowest sliver of historical time, the immediately pre-youthquake Britain of 1962, when, as Ian McEwan writes in the novella upon which the movie is based, “to be young was a social encumbrance . . . a faintly embarrassing condition for which marriage was the beginning of a cure.”

But the picture, directed by Dominic Cooke and co-starring Billy Howle, is tender toward its virginal newlywed protagonists rather than mocking and mean. “Satire creates distance. I wanted the reader, and now the viewer, to get right up close to them,” says McEwan, who handled the screenplay adaptation himself.

In bearing and appearance—”certainly beautiful, but in a sculpted, strong-boned way,” as the book has it—Ronan is uncannily right for the role of Florence Ponting, the violinist who takes the hand (but not willingly much else) of her groom, Edward Mayhew. “The physicality of Florence is so important, because there is so much that isn’t said,” Ronan explains. “And Ian writes with such love and understanding. I don’t think there are many films that have tackled this subject this way. Usually, it’s either a caricature, like American Pie, or overly sentimental.”