Hello! Welcome to I Heart Saoirse, a fansite for actress Saoirse Ronan. She is known for films such as "Atonement", "Hanna", "The Host" and "The Grand Budapest Hotel", and was most recently seen in "Brooklyn" - a film that got her an Academy Award nomination as Leading Actress, the 2nd she's received in her career. We have been sharing news, photos, videos and other information on Saoirse and her career since 2013, thanks to the support of many other fans around the world. We appreciate your visit, and hope you come back soon!
Category: ‘Articles’ Category
Gabby   //   February 24,2016   //   0 Comments   •   Articles, Interviews, Photoshoots

Saoirse is featured on the current issue of Interview Magazine, along actresses Winona Ryder, Jodie Foster and Charlotte Gainsbourg. We have updated our gallery with images from the photoshoot, and you can read the article below.

Saoirse RonanSaoirse RonanSaoirse RonanSaoirse Ronan

When she emerges almost without warning from a snowbound wood as the semi-feral warrior namesake of 2011’s Hanna, Saoirse Ronan completely overwhelmed the world and her antagonists (including an evil spy played by Cate Blanchett) with an easy balance of almost preternatural talent and rigorously drilled skills. Same for the actress who, a few years earlier, at the ripe old age of 12, was cast in her major film debut in director Joe Wright’s sweeping 2007 adaptation of the Ian McEwan novel Atonement—and picked up an Oscar nomination for her troubles. In the nearly nine years since her first film, all Ronan has done is work with Peter Weir (The Way Back, 2010), with Peter Jackson, on the 2009 adaptation of Alice Sebold’s monumental best-seller The Lovely Bones, with Neil Jordan (Byzantium, 2012), and with Wes Anderson, playing the doomed baker-outlaw-romantic Agatha in 2014’s The Grand Budapest Hotel.

In 2015, the New York-born, Ireland-raised Ronan drew on her dual roots to play an Irish immigrant in New York in the 1950s, in the lauded romantic drama Brooklyn, and secured her second nomination from the Academy. This February, as she wound down campaign season and geared up for her part in the Broadway production of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, Ronan, now 21, talked to an actress and director who knows from the Oscars-two-time-winner Jodie Foster.

(Continued from Jodie Foster)

JODIE FOSTER: Do you live with your parents at home?

SAOIRSE RONAN: I moved away to London when I was 19, actually about six months before we made Brooklyn. So by the time we made the film, I was still incredibly homesick. I don’t know if you found it this way when you were young, but to move away is very different from just working away from home. It was something that I needed and I wanted to do. I wanted to leave Ireland and have anonymity while I was young so I could be stupid and relaxed, I suppose. So I lived on my own and got used to paying bills every month and washing dishes and not leaving them in the sink for five days. New York was always the end goal for me. It was always inevitable that I’d move here because I’d had such a strong connection with it from a very young age. I guess because I know I have roots here, and the energy is really palpable. As soon as you land, you feel like invigorated or something. I feel like it’s a good place to be when you’re young.

Read More

Gabby   //   February 17,2016   //   0 Comments   •   Articles, Interviews, Photoshoots

A new interview with Saoirse has been published by TIME OUT New York, along with a brand new photo session. Our gallery has been updated with the images, and you can read the article below.

Saoirse RonanSaoirse RonanSaoirse RonanSaoirse Ronan

“I’m away to America,” Saoirse Ronan tells us, hiding her character’s nervousness behind a wall of sheer moxie in Brooklyn, the most stirring film of 2015. Don’t fight us on this one: You’ve either already seen it and rocked a smile-cry for two hours, or you’re going to (and you’re in for a treat). A wrenchingly beautiful Irish immigrant drama, Brooklyn does double duty, re-creating the 1950s-era borough in all its melting-pot diversity (and Dodgers-loving Italian boyfriends), while also giving the 21-year-old Ronan the kind of role—romantically conflicted, blooming, courageously open—that transforms young stars into icons.

Ronan, who was born in the Bronx to Irish parents and moved to the Emerald Isle when she was three years old, can’t really be compared to her peers—even the exceptional ones. She steals busy movies, like The Grand Budapest Hotel, with her classical, silent-era stillness. She possesses a lilting brogue that can win over even the most cynical cinephile. And with her Oscar nomination for Brooklyn—her second, the first being for a dazzling run, at age 13, in 2007’s Atonement—Ronan is the second-youngest performer in all of movie history who can call herself a two-time competitive veteran of Hollywood’s biggest night.

Now the actor wants to change things up. “One of the things I am very conscious of is doing something different every time,” she tells me in a corner booth of Alphabet City’s Ace Bar, where she’s just played pool and darts like an after-work regular. In late March, the actor takes on Broadway with the tricky role of Abigail, the vengeful Salemite of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, under the direction of high-concept theater heavyweight Ivo van Hove (A View from the Bridge, Scenes from a Marriage). There’s also her upcoming leading role in Lady Bird, the first feature directed by indie It girl Greta Gerwig—a film in which we can only hope Ronan becomes an eccentric new cousin to Gerwig’s Frances Ha character.

Read More

Gabby   //   February 08,2016   //   0 Comments   •   Articles, Interviews, Photoshoots

Saoirse is the covergirl of New York Magazine’s Spring Fashion issue. We have uploaded the featured photoshoot to our gallery, and you can read the article below.

Saoirse RonanSaoirse RonanSaoirse RonanSaoirse Ronan

Eight years ago, Saoirse Ronan made her first impression on U.S. audiences in Atonement as Briony, the confused, vengeful girl whose lie sets the plot in motion. That watchful, unsettling performance won her an Oscar nomination at age 13. Since then, she has made a couple of film appearances per year at most (a child assassin holding her own against Cate Blanchett in Hanna; a clever baker in The Grand Budapest Hotel), staying more or less above the Hollywood fray (thanks in large part to the grounding influence of her parents — her father, Paul, is a working actor). That may prove tougher now: At 21, she’s again an Oscar nominee, this time as a leading actress, for her performance as Irish immigrant Eilis in Brooklyn. Ronan’s own immigration experience was the opposite of Eilis’s: She was born in the Bronx and lived there until she was 3, then moved back to Ireland. But now she’s returned to the city that has such a hold on her imagination to make her Broadway debut in The Crucible as Abigail Williams — a confused, vengeful girl not unlike her first big role. We talked to her about going onstage for the first time and discussing child stardom with Jodie Foster. Her name, by the way, is pronounced Sir-sha.

Read More

Bella   //   January 21,2016   //   0 Comments   •   Articles, Interviews

Film School Rejects posted a new interview with Saoirse this week. It’s a great read with Saoirse talking about the immigrant experience and women’s roles in the industry. Read the full story below:

Tomris Laffly: Congratulations on your Best Actress Oscar nomination and the success of Brooklyn.

Saoirse Ronan: Thank you.

You’ve done the Oscar rounds before for Atonement as a very young teenager. How is your experience different now vs. then?

I think I’m aware of what goes into this whole aspect of the industry a little bit more. I wasn’t really part of it when I was a kid because I was away working in New Zealand when the nominations came out, when I was 13. I hadn’t really done anything for it. For ages I assumed, “Oh, that’s it. You just get nominated.” I guess with this, like you (because I know you’ve been very supportive of the film,) I’ve been with it from day one. I signed on a year before the film was even made so to have gone through each stage with the film up until now, it means more.

I remember my mam said it to me when I was younger that to get an Oscar when you’re too young, when you’ve only just started, it’s wonderful but what that award could represent or what a nomination could represent later on in your life is [what’s really] incredible and meaningful. We see Leo and Martin Scorsese; when they are finally recognized, that represents a body of work. So I think just because I’ve worked for over half my life at this stage, it means a lot more to me.

Read More

Bella   //   January 04,2016   //   0 Comments   •   Articles, Brooklyn, Press

Saoirse has landed a spot on Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list in the Hollywood & Entertainment category, following her turn in ‘Brooklyn’. The annual list highlights “young entrepreneurs, breakout talents, and change agents in 20 different sectors”. Here is Forbes’ write-up:

Saoirse Ronan, 21
Actor

Saoirse Ronan, known for her roles in “Atonement” and “The Lovely Bones” has set critics fluttering with ‘Brooklyn’, which many will expect will earn her a second Oscar nomination. The Irish-born Ronan makes her Broadway debut as Abigail Williams in “The Crucible” in 2016.

Gabby   //   November 30,2015   //   0 Comments   •   Articles, Photoshoots

Saoirse and a very talented group of actresses gathered earlier this month to talk with The Envelope about their films, their personal approaches to work, and their industry. Participating in the conversation were Cate Blanchett, Brie Larson, Helen Mirren, Charlotte Rampling and Lily Tomlin. A beautiful new portrait of Saoirse was released along with the article, and you can view it here.

Here are edited excerpts from the free-flowing conversation moderated by Times film writers Rebecca Keegan and Mark Olsen in which the actresses discuss the roles that hit too close to home, the secret alchemy of working with directors and how they know when to say “no.”

Keegan: Helen, you recently played gossip columnist Hedda Hopper in “Trumbo.” We’re in the L.A. Times building, which is where she worked. How do you think she would handle an actors roundtable?

Mirren: She’d certainly be wearing a hat … the difference would be that none of us would be relaxed because we would know that we had to obey not just what Hedda was requiring of us, but what our studios were requiring of us. I presume we’re all much, much freer than any of those actresses.

Blanchett: No, I was bought many, many years ago. Cheaply. 50 cents.

Keegan: It seems like there is more of an expectation of actors to share of their personal lives now, perhaps, than there was then. Saoirse, how do you strike that balance between wanting to be able to preserve something for yourself and also share a little bit of who you are?

Ronan: I started when I was very young. Even from the age of 12, the only thing that was important was actually the film, and that was the only thing that I was ever going to talk about. Naturally, as actors, we’re very, very open, we’re very emotional and so it’s easier to kind of be expressive…. But for me it’s important to protect my life outside of work.

Read More

Gabby   //   November 03,2015   //   0 Comments   •   Articles, Photoshoots, Videos

Saoirse has recently talked to USA Today about her upcoming film, ‘Brooklyn’, in which she played her first Irish character. We have updated our photo gallery with a photo session that was releasedwith the article, and you can watch her interview below.

Saoirse RonanSaoirse RonanSaoirse RonanSaoirse Ronan

NEW YORK — Until Brooklyn, Saoirse Ronan had never played an Irish character in a movie. But what could seem like a major casting oversight is actually no coincidence.

“There’s a phrase back at home, when something is ‘diddly idle,’ ” says Ronan, 21, with a grin. “That’s when someone tries to do this stereotypical Irish film, where everyone’s a farmer and we’ve never seen the big city.

“We’ve done that and seen that and most of the time, it feels quite flat,” she adds. “So I was waiting for something like this to come along.”

In the 1950s-set Brooklyn (opens Wednesday in New York and Los Angeles, before expanding nationwide Nov. 25), Ronan plays a young Irish woman named Eilis Lacey whose older sister, Rose, arranges for her to move to New York in hopes of finding better opportunities. Taking a job at a department store, enrolling in night class and falling for a sweet Italian boy, Tony (Emory Cohen), Eilis overcomes homesickness and embraces her city life — that is, until she’s called back to Ireland under grave circumstances, and must choose between her two homes and suitors (Domhnall Gleeson, as Irish beau Jim, who falls for her when she returns).

Read More