Author Topic: Rate Saoirse's Films....  (Read 596 times)

Steve 7216

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 155
    • View Profile
Re: Rate Saoirse's Films....
« Reply #15 on: April 24, 2017, 10:18:15 PM »
Steve, have you read the first draft of the screenplay of On Chesil Beach? I posted a link to it in another thread in this subforum. After reading the book I was doubtful that it would really be a good idea for a movie (because not a huge amount actually happens in the story, save for the extensive flashbacks), but McEwan's screenplay ties it all together really well. And to think it was only a first draft... I'm sure it will only be better when it's finished!

Not yet Mark.  Unfortunately, I spend too much time on the internet and not enough reading books and the like.  I had two thoughts after reading the novel as it pertains to the upcoming film: one was as you mentioned, not a lot happens throughout the course of the story.  Secondly, despite the story taking place in the pre-sexual U.K. revolution according to the author, I felt Florence's character would be difficult to understand given the world we reside in.  That's why I mentioned in a very recent post the belief that Saoirse has her most challenging role playing her.  Perhaps we may be given a clearer understanding of the exact relationship she had with her father in the film.

What can you tell us about this draft?


MarkRoick

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 53
  • Home is home.
    • View Profile
    • about.me
Re: Rate Saoirse's Films....
« Reply #16 on: April 25, 2017, 02:32:17 PM »
If it's a true first draft and not the reworking of something even earlier, it's testament to how gifted a writer Mr McEwan truly is... Or as it is based on his own novel perhaps just how easy it is for him to immerse himself back in this world.

There is no direct answer to the topic of Florence's relationship with her father but it's highly implied there was sexual abuse going on, and that she is rather scared of her father.

As for the topic of the sexual revolution... I think this is addressed by the end of the film (and novel) when Florence makes the proposal of an open type of relationship to Edward - at least open on his part. After reading the script it really saddened me to think of how this awkward situation of sexual frustration must have been so common in the past and even so today. It's certainly the most intimate material that Saoirse will have acted, save perhaps for those scenes in Brooklyn and How I Live Now.
“You need to do what’s right for you and what your instinct is telling you to do, because only then, I think, you can be the best version of yourself.” - Saoirse

Steve 7216

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 155
    • View Profile
Re: Rate Saoirse's Films....
« Reply #17 on: April 25, 2017, 09:41:34 PM »
If it's a true first draft and not the reworking of something even earlier, it's testament to how gifted a writer Mr McEwan truly is... Or as it is based on his own novel perhaps just how easy it is for him to immerse himself back in this world.

There is no direct answer to the topic of Florence's relationship with her father but it's highly implied there was sexual abuse going on, and that she is rather scared of her father.

As for the topic of the sexual revolution... I think this is addressed by the end of the film (and novel) when Florence makes the proposal of an open type of relationship to Edward - at least open on his part. After reading the script it really saddened me to think of how this awkward situation of sexual frustration must have been so common in the past and even so today. It's certainly the most intimate material that Saoirse will have acted, save perhaps for those scenes in Brooklyn and How I Live Now.

Given the information in your post, it makes sense to me one could be so damaged by such abuse that she is actually repulsed to an extreme by "physical" intimacy.  I didn't suspect anything when her character had recollections about the boat trips with her father.  Other readers picked up on it, although the author seemed to suggest one might look at this in different ways.

To me, her proposal was very sad because in those days (and today) beginning a relationship and telling your parter he/she can go outside the marriage is pretty drastic.  Florence no doubt cared very much for him, but not wanting any relations with her own new husband is way outside the norm.  Perhaps Saoirse is the very best young actress to pull off such a complex role.   

MMSouth

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Re: Rate Saoirse's Films....
« Reply #18 on: May 12, 2017, 12:22:31 PM »
The vast bulk of Saoirse’s roles involve characters who are somehow disengaged, alienated or detached from the society in which they live.  Maybe that’s why many of them seem to have a lot going on inside their head.

Atonement - Only child in her household, immerses herself in creating her own fictional stories.
Brooklyn - In Ireland she had no future, in New York she’s lonely and homesick.
Hanna - Raised in the wilderness, thinks she’s an abnormal freak, never had a friend before.
Byzantium - Constantly moving town, overprotective mother, discouraged from communicating.
Lovely Bones - Dead for most of the film, can’t communicate with family or friends on earth.
Stockholm - Traumatised, internalised, uncommunicative.
How I Live Now - At the start of the film she’s a neurotic misanthrope who hates herself.
The Way Back - Orphan wandering in the wilderness.
The Host - Wanda can’t fit in with souls or humans, Melanie can only communicate with Wanda.
City of Ember - Orphan who realises something’s wrong with her world but isn’t sure what it is.
Violet and Daisy - Pretends to be a hit-woman, one friend in Violet.
Lost River - Living in decaying suburbia, only family is her grandma, best friend is a rat.
The Crucible - Rejected vindictive deceitful misanthrope! (Saoirse: “She’s the worst”)

It’s probably no coincidence that there’s this pattern is her work, she always seems to be looking for challenging roles.  Her forthcoming roles in The Seagull, On Chesil Beach, Mary Queen of Scots and Sweetness in the Belly could be in a similar vein.  But maybe Lady Bird will be something a little different, like Galway Girl.

By the way, there are at least two “goofs” in the Galway Girl video.  1/ After she throws the dart there’s one lodged in the bullseye with its tail angled in her direction which wasn’t there a few seconds before, but the one which she actually threw is lodged in the base of the dartboard at an acute angle.  Maybe she was meant to miss the board so that her dart would fall to the floor leaving the dart in the bullseye as hers.  2/ There’s a red heart shaped badge on the front left shoulder of her jacket, or on the right as we and Ed Sheeran look at it.  But near the end where she runs through the crowd to grab Ed by the hands and spin around him, the red badge is on the opposite side.  The editor has mirror flipped that one shot.  He’s also flipped the shot where she’s panting for breath in the street.

Steve 7216

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 155
    • View Profile
Re: Rate Saoirse's Films....
« Reply #19 on: May 13, 2017, 01:15:45 AM »
Fine observations MMSouth.  It's an angle I hadn't previously thought of in connection with her role choices.  Taken in total, the roles you referenced are much preferred to playing the girlfriend to a male lead in a film.

MMSouth

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Re: Rate Saoirse's Films....
« Reply #20 on: May 14, 2017, 11:06:20 AM »
The notable exception from the above list is The Grand Budapest Hotel.  She may have joined it to work with Wes Anderson or maybe to work with the big name cast members.  Having said that, the bulk of her scenes only feature Zero and sometimes M. Gustave.  She only momentarily appears in scenes with other name actors.  Agatha starts the film without any demons, she has no back story, she’s got a steady job and a suitor.  She faces no challenges until she has to help “fence” the stolen painting.  Then Anderson kills off both M. Gustave and Agatha in the same sentence without any warning.  This film is so out of step with the rest of her resume.  But on the other hand it’s the highest grossing film in which she’s appeared.

jlent

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 82
    • View Profile
Re: Rate Saoirse's Films....
« Reply #21 on: May 14, 2017, 12:48:35 PM »
Stockholm, Pennsylvania's plot description would even contain the words "disengaged, alienated and detached from the society."
On the other hand, I'm not sure a kid's adventure story like City of Ember can bear the weight of such scrutiny: she saves society. Nor can Brooklyn, which superficially bears resemblance to your criteria but is different because she was comfortable in (Irish) society only to have it ripped away from her. But she longs to be part of something. By the end, her biggest dream seems to be starting a family on Long Island. Quite different from someone like, say, Briony in Atonement.
I Could Never Be Your Woman also doesn't fit, but that was her first movie
I'm quibbling. You're definitely onto something. At first, it bothered me. The idea of her being pigeonholed has dogged her before (her ethereal phase from Hanna through The Host). But being labeled as someone like this, for which the word "complex" could be substituted, isn't a bad thing at all. Bravo.

Regarding the Galway Girl video, which I confess to viewing dozens of times, adding to its 43 million views, there's also the selfie he takes with his phone without hitting the shutter button. What bugs me most about the darts scene, though, isn't the dart in the board, it's a mistake Saoirse makes. When Sheeran throws the dart, Saoirse's eyes follow it to the point where it presumably hits the board. Only it hasn't hit the board. Saoirse then turns her head to the guy it actually hit. What, did the dart hover at the board for half a second before making a sharp right turn into the guy's back?       
 
« Last Edit: May 14, 2017, 12:52:55 PM by jlent »

Steve 7216

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 155
    • View Profile
Re: Rate Saoirse's Films....
« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2017, 01:49:22 PM »
The mentioning of SP leads me to bring up both the director and co-leading lady.  I saw 3 Generations yesterday, a film originally titled "About Ray", and I feel Beckwith is still finding her footing as a writer (or co-writer in this case) of feature films.  It hasn't been well received critically, and one problem IMO was the focus shifted from the young trans (originally woman/wanting to be a man) character to his/her mother.

Cynthia Nixon should be in the discussion for an Oscar for her portrayal of Emily Dickinson in "A Quiet Passion."  It's so early, and this kind of film won't make any impression box-office wise, but it just might be the kind of performance actors don't forget come awards' time.  It was a beautifully made film.


MMSouth

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Re: Rate Saoirse's Films....
« Reply #23 on: May 15, 2017, 12:26:18 PM »
Agree with a lot of what you say.  In the case of Brooklyn, Eilis starts out in her hometown which is familiar/comfortable but lacking in challenge/direction/opportunity, then she’s sent to New York by her sister (disengaged), then she suffers her homesickness (alienated), before overcoming it with a little help from Father Flood and Tony, and then returning to Ireland where her newfound confidence creates opportunities that weren’t there for her before.  In most of her roles the disengaged/alienated/detached phase is an opening state which gets resolved as it did in Brooklyn.  The ones that don’t fit that pattern would be Stockholm which has a real downer of an ending and The Crucible in which Abigail is completely totally unassailably irredeemable.  In fact Brooklyn is more complex because the disengaged/alienated phase is resolved by half way through the film before she faces the new conundrum of Home #1 vs Home #2.  That’s one reason why Brooklyn’s such a good story.  It’s multi-layered.  Another reason is the supporting characters, especially her mother who is multi-layered in herself: a complex mixture of motherly love, grieving, fear of loneliness, manipulative behaviour and passive-aggressive tendencies.  (I don’t like the last two.)

Yes, I was drawing a bit of a long bow with City of Ember.  But while most of Ember’s citizens just accept their world, Lina is the one who realises there’s something wrong and tries to do something about it.  So she’s in some sense disengaged from most of the rest of the citizens.

I deliberately left three of her early films off the list including I Could Never be Your Woman because they don’t fit the mould at all.  She was just getting a start in the industry in those films.  But even then she knew she wanted to play Briony in Atonement rather than typical kid’s roles.

I think it’s fair to say that she’s never played the same role twice.  Almost every role is multifaceted and complex and that’s not changing with her forthcoming roles.  She’s one actress who could never be pigeonholed into “Rom Coms”, not to say that she couldn’t do one if she felt so inclined.  Good luck to her.

I tend to think that Saoirse’s double take when Ed throws the dart is deliberate to emphasise that Ed’s SO bad at darts that the dart didn’t go anywhere near where she expected.  His hand movements look pretty hesitant when he’s lining up the throw.  Maybe he’s a little intimidated by Galway Girl!  But notice that when she throws the dart her arm motion is way too low to go anywhere near the bullseye.  It’s a great little video.  Sure she’s acting but she must have had a blast doing it.  Maybe a boost for Irish tourism?  Notice too that one of the photos on the wall of the garret apartment is Saoirse with a dog.  (Video still trending #1 on You Tube as I write this.)

jlent

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 82
    • View Profile
Re: Rate Saoirse's Films....
« Reply #24 on: May 15, 2017, 03:35:11 PM »
I hadn't even noticed the dog photos! There are two of them. The dark-furred dog looks to be Sassy, Saoirse's late, beloved border collie.
http://www.independent.ie/woman/celeb-news/its-a-dogs-life-for-saoirse-away-from-her-best-friend-26630741.html
I'm gobsmacked by the success of the Galway Girl video, now 46 million views and counting. In 11 days! The reason is because of Saoirse, even if not all the fans know it. They come for Ed, they stay, and keep coming back, for Saoirse (and, admittedly, the song, but it's not THAT great)
She's in just about every scene, Sheeran's only in two, the very beginning and very end.
The thing is she projects joy, and happiness to be with Ed, and the fans respond to that and it makes them happy and wanting to have the experience of the video in their own lives - just read some of the comments.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2017, 06:58:32 PM by jlent »