Author Topic: Lady Bird  (Read 38767 times)

Steve 7216

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1019
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1200 on: January 11, 2018, 09:53:29 PM »
DGA Nomination: Greta Gerwig

Greta was the only woman nominated, which is quite meaningful this year and beyond huge for Oscar nominations.

Yes, it's a big deal Jim.  Regardless of what some might infer because of all the scandals, this nom is obviously an indicator that this critical guild has real respect for the film.

Steve 7216

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1019
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1201 on: January 11, 2018, 10:00:40 PM »
Theatre counts for coming weekend:

> EXPANDING
The Post   2,820   +2,784
Molly's Game   1,708   +100
Lady Bird   652   +90
Call Me by Your Name   174   +57
Phantom Thread   62   +56
The Florida Project   51   +14

> DECLINING
Darkest Hour   1,692   -41
The Disaster Artist   371   -107

More good news MM.  I'd hoped for a bit larger expansion this weekend, but my guess is A24 is waiting for the Oscar nominations.  I'm surprised Darkest Hour is losing a small number of theaters.  There is a tradition of very significant moviegoing here during the holiday period from Christmas through New Year's week.  When I saw Darkest Hour, a good sized auditorium was packed with elderly people, and I had to sit in the very first row.  The distributor was very strategic in going legit wide during this period.  I'm waiting to see if it can catch LB.  LB will get a lot more pub because it's likely to receive at least four Oscar noms including best picture, and no one is sure if DH will get the big nod.

jlent

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1202 on: January 13, 2018, 02:34:51 AM »
Laurie Metcalf on Colbert tonight.

Steve 7216

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1019
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1203 on: January 13, 2018, 03:31:56 AM »
Laurie Metcalf on Colbert tonight.

Thanks Jim.  Could you post it here tomorrow if possible?

BTW, Saoirse will accept the newly named Santa Barbara Award at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival the first week of February.  It's her third award from the festival, and many great actors have been so honored in the past.  Anne Thompson mentioned it's a must stop on the road to the Oscars.

http://tinyurl.com/yazgl6gg

Here is an excerpt from Variety with salient details:

Quote
The award had previously been called the Montecito award, a trophy is given to “a person in the entertainment industry who has made a great contribution to film.”

Past recipients of the award include Isabelle Huppert, Sylvester Stallone, Jennifer Aniston, Oprah Winfrey, Daniel Day-Lewis, Geoffrey Rush, Julianne Moore, Kate Winslet, Javier Bardem, Bill Condon, and Naomi Watts. Ronan will received the award on Feb. 4 at the Arlington Theatre.

“In ‘Lady Bird,’ Saoirse Ronan has once again proven that she is a force of nature and one of her generation’s most exciting young talents,” SBIFF executive director Roger Durling said. “She embodies her characters with a poignant accuracy and ease every time she appears on screen.”

Ronan’s credits also include “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” “Hanna,” “The Lovely Bones,” and “The Way Back.” She has received Academy Award nominations for her performances in “Atonement” and “Brooklyn,” and recently was awarded the Golden Globe for best actress in a motion picture — musical or comedy for her performance in “Lady Bird.”

« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 03:38:34 AM by Steve 7216 »

BrazenRaisin

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 68
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1204 on: January 13, 2018, 07:07:45 AM »
What's particularly interesting is that Saoirse's by far the youngest recipient. She's the only 20-something to be honoured with the award and a decade younger than Kate Winslet was when she received it in 2009:

2005: Annette Bening (then 46)
2006: Naomi Watts (then 37)
2007: Bill Condon (then 51)
2008: Javier Bardem (then 38)
2009: Kate Winslet (then 33)
2010: Julianne Moore (then 49)
2011: Geoffrey Rush (then 59)
2012: N/A
2013: Daniel Day-Lewis (then 55)
2014: Oprah Winfrey (then 60)
2015: Jennifer Aniston (then 45)
2016: Sylvester Stallone (then 69)
2017: Isabelle Huppert (then 63)
2018: Saoirse Ronan (23)
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 07:26:24 AM by BrazenRaisin »

Steve 7216

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1019
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1205 on: January 13, 2018, 12:48:03 PM »
What's particularly interesting is that Saoirse's by far the youngest recipient. She's the only 20-something to be honoured with the award and a decade younger than Kate Winslet was when she received it in 2009:

2005: Annette Bening (then 46)
2006: Naomi Watts (then 37)
2007: Bill Condon (then 51)
2008: Javier Bardem (then 38)
2009: Kate Winslet (then 33)
2010: Julianne Moore (then 49)
2011: Geoffrey Rush (then 59)
2012: N/A
2013: Daniel Day-Lewis (then 55)
2014: Oprah Winfrey (then 60)
2015: Jennifer Aniston (then 45)
2016: Sylvester Stallone (then 69)
2017: Isabelle Huppert (then 63)
2018: Saoirse Ronan (23)

This sort of puts her stature in perspective BR.  :)


Steve 7216

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1019
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1207 on: January 13, 2018, 03:32:30 PM »
As requested:
http://www.cbs.com/shows/the-late-show-with-stephen-colbert/video/86CA6A54-394D-19A0-83BC-ED69F4A5B61F/laurie-metcalf-s-lady-bird-performance-made-audiences-call-their-moms/

Thanks Jim.  That was more positive exposure for the film.  She has a very expressive face.  BTW, we'll have to wait for the SAG awards and ultimately the Oscars, but I honestly feel she should be the favorite in her category.  A film writer was mentioning the "academy" acting branch may very well be more receptive as they're likely to have respect for her theater work.  Janney plays a very evil and cold woman who is abusive quite well, but the performance is in only that particular register.  Metcalf has much more dimension with Marion.

MMSouth

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 378
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1208 on: January 13, 2018, 09:15:48 PM »
Georgia Film Critics Association:

Best Picture - "Lady Bird"
Best Director - "Lady Bird" - Greta Gerwig
Best Actress - Saoirse Ronan ("Lady Bird")
Best Supporting Actress - Laurie Metcalf ("Lady Bird")
Best Original Screenplay - "Get Out" - Jordan Peele
Best Ensemble - "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri"
Breakthrough Award - Jordan Peele ("Get Out")

Steve 7216

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1019
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1209 on: January 15, 2018, 03:29:45 AM »
Here is a link to a well presented article about Saoirse in The Guardian:

http://tinyurl.com/ycwxcdnb

trvscrosley

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 258
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1210 on: January 17, 2018, 06:41:08 AM »
A24 has pushed quite a bit of screenings out lately, which some of them I think were done for SAG. We'll see if they pay off next week once we get the results of some guilds, SAG, and the Oscar nominations!

Here's a screening Q&A that A24 put out today:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBb_JROtJiw

Steve 7216

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1019
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1211 on: January 17, 2018, 05:13:13 PM »
A24 has pushed quite a bit of screenings out lately, which some of them I think were done for SAG. We'll see if they pay off next week once we get the results of some guilds, SAG, and the Oscar nominations!

Here's a screening Q&A that A24 put out today:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBb_JROtJiw

That was a good conversation.  We'll find out quite a bit more this weekend with the PGA and SAG.  I was wondering not only about scenes completely cut out of LB, but there are a number of stills with images not in the actual scenes.  Hopefully whoever produces the DVD will be generous with the extra material.

BTW, it appears LB will reach 40M by the time Oscar noms are announced on Tuesday morning.  One hint of what could be a very good day for the film can be gleaned by watching the prerecorded part starting at 8:22 A.M. Eastern Standard Time.  If LB can nab a "Film Editing" nom, it will demonstrate very significant strength in the noms starting at 8:38.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2018, 02:39:51 AM by Steve 7216 »

Steve 7216

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1019
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1212 on: January 18, 2018, 02:42:10 AM »
From Kris Tapley:

Quote
“Lady Bird” held a perfect score of 100% on Rotten Tomatoes until an attention-seeking misfit made a lot of noise about labeling his own mixed-positive review “rotten” in order to take it down a peg. His antics aside, the film is one of the year’s most popular. But in something of a reverse take from those knocking “Get Out,” there are some who feel that Greta Gerwig’s solo directorial debut doesn’t have “big” or “important” enough themes on its mind. It’s “just” a young girl’s coming of age story, as if that necessitates a shallow rendering. The film is obviously more than a trifle; it has moved masses.

MMSouth

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 378
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1213 on: January 18, 2018, 09:16:17 AM »
I managed to see Lady Bird for the first time yesterday.  In a cinema too!  A few brief observations whilst not giving away too much:

Lady Bird feels far more like an Indie than any other project Saoirse has done.  It looks and feels Indie.

It may take a few more viewings to fully appreciate Saoirse’s characterisation of Lady Bird, she’s pretty complex and hasn’t really settled on who she is until the later stages of the film.  Things move very fast from scene to scene (the editing is really impressive).

Saoirse is totally correct when she comments on the mutual love between Lady Bird and her mom Marion.  It’s absolutely the overriding element of the film and is there to see in virtually every scene they share.  Their relationship is beautifully done and feels so real to life, like you’re looking in on the family next door.  Their estrangement towards the end of the film feels so much like a real relationship.  The moment when Lady Bird not quite slams the car door at the airport says so much.

The two best scenes (in my opinion) are the one at the back door of the café and the one where Marion drives away from the airport.  They’re both totally heartbreaking.  The scene where Lady Bird is pleading with Marion in the kitchen is also high up there.

Laurie Metcalf is superb in virtually ever scene she has.

Tracy Lett’s as Lady Bird’s dad is wonderful.  He’s such a warm reassuring presence in her life, the person she can most rely on.

There’s a great cut where one moment the headmistress is telling Lady Bird that love and attention can be the same thing, and the next moment Marion is standing outside a fitting room as Lady Bird tries on prom dresses.  If viewers didn’t realise it already, it reinforces how much Marion loves her daughter, even if Lady Bird then proceeds to show how Marion can’t really express it.

Both Hedges and Chalamet are excellent.  Totally different from each other but equally effective.  Lady Bird learns a lot about life from her dalliances with each of them.  One key moment is when she’s walking out of Kyle’s house and sees his cancer stricken dad sitting in a chair.  I tend to think that really reinforces to her how self obsessed Kyle is and that she’d be better off with better friends.

The coming back together of Lady Bird and Julie, and their shared prom night is totally heart warming.  It’s the most joyous sequence of the film.

I thought that overall the soundtrack was very restrained, often you barely even notice it.

My only criticism of Saoirse’s depiction of Lady Bird is that she does look rather older than seventeen.  That’s pretty much unavoidable and is reinforced by her looking a fair bit taller and stronger than many of the other school girls, and her screen mom for that matter.  But her acne worked out really well.  It’s there on her cheeks in most every scene and adds real authenticity.  Lady Bird looks and feels so different from anything else she’s done but she completely inhabits that character.  Totally committed, totally convincing and totally unique, warts and all.

Steve 7216

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1019
    • View Profile
Re: Lady Bird
« Reply #1214 on: January 18, 2018, 01:27:29 PM »
I managed to see Lady Bird for the first time yesterday.  In a cinema too!  A few brief observations whilst not giving away too much:

Lady Bird feels far more like an Indie than any other project Saoirse has done.  It looks and feels Indie.

It may take a few more viewings to fully appreciate Saoirse’s characterisation of Lady Bird, she’s pretty complex and hasn’t really settled on who she is until the later stages of the film.  Things move very fast from scene to scene (the editing is really impressive).

Saoirse is totally correct when she comments on the mutual love between Lady Bird and her mom Marion.  It’s absolutely the overriding element of the film and is there to see in virtually every scene they share.  Their relationship is beautifully done and feels so real to life, like you’re looking in on the family next door.  Their estrangement towards the end of the film feels so much like a real relationship.  The moment when Lady Bird not quite slams the car door at the airport says so much.

The two best scenes (in my opinion) are the one at the back door of the café and the one where Marion drives away from the airport.  They’re both totally heartbreaking.  The scene where Lady Bird is pleading with Marion in the kitchen is also high up there.

Laurie Metcalf is superb in virtually ever scene she has.

Tracy Lett’s as Lady Bird’s dad is wonderful.  He’s such a warm reassuring presence in her life, the person she can most rely on.

There’s a great cut where one moment the headmistress is telling Lady Bird that love and attention can be the same thing, and the next moment Marion is standing outside a fitting room as Lady Bird tries on prom dresses.  If viewers didn’t realise it already, it reinforces how much Marion loves her daughter, even if Lady Bird then proceeds to show how Marion can’t really express it.

Both Hedges and Chalamet are excellent.  Totally different from each other but equally effective.  Lady Bird learns a lot about life from her dalliances with each of them.  One key moment is when she’s walking out of Kyle’s house and sees his cancer stricken dad sitting in a chair.  I tend to think that really reinforces to her how self obsessed Kyle is and that she’d be better off with better friends.

The coming back together of Lady Bird and Julie, and their shared prom night is totally heart warming.  It’s the most joyous sequence of the film.

I thought that overall the soundtrack was very restrained, often you barely even notice it.

My only criticism of Saoirse’s depiction of Lady Bird is that she does look rather older than seventeen.  That’s pretty much unavoidable and is reinforced by her looking a fair bit taller and stronger than many of the other school girls, and her screen mom for that matter.  But her acne worked out really well.  It’s there on her cheeks in most every scene and adds real authenticity.  Lady Bird looks and feels so different from anything else she’s done but she completely inhabits that character.  Totally committed, totally convincing and totally unique, warts and all.

I'm glad you finally saw the film MM.  :D  Did you attend a special screening?  I can't complain about any of the sequences, but for whatever reason, the very last part of the film when LB arrives in New York until the end began to resonate with me very strongly once I had a chance to view the film many times.  I'm not spoiling here, but the epiphany her character goes through is not only the cherry on a very fine cake but emotionally powerful.

Gabby, if you're reading, I'm all of a sudden not getting email updates when a poster enters a new comment.