Author Topic: Loving Vincent  (Read 238 times)

MarkRoick

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Loving Vincent
« on: August 04, 2017, 09:56:54 PM »
I see that a new trailer (featuring a brief speaking part by Saoirse!) was released today, so it seems as good a time as any to start a new thread for this movie. The animation looks really great.

“You need to do what’s right for you and what your instinct is telling you to do, because only then, I think, you can be the best version of yourself.” - Saoirse

Steve 7216

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Re: Loving Vincent
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2017, 12:03:06 AM »
Trailer looks great.

Here are links to two fine reviews from Variety and The Hollywood Reporter:

http://tinyurl.com/y8eljfrn

http://tinyurl.com/yc245ver

CountJohn

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Re: Loving Vincent
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2017, 03:01:15 AM »
This looks gorgeous. I wish more animated films went for the painting look instead of being cartoony, even if it's not to this extent.

Saoirse is beautiful as a painting! As in real life.

MMSouth

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Re: Loving Vincent
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2017, 10:34:58 AM »
To those of you who knows how the industry works, is this good news?

http://www.screendaily.com/news/uk-distributor-slate-day-expands-for-third-edition/5120689.article

UK Distributor Slate Day expands for third edition

London event to take place across two days in 2017.

The event will see 25 distributors presenting upcoming slates to more than 300 exhibitors and will take place across two days rather than one, running September 19-20 at London’s Picturehouse Central.

Distributors scheduled to attend include studios Disney, Fox, and Lionsgate, alongside indies including Arrow, Altitude, MUBI and Dogwoof. Films expected to be presented include The Florida Project and Loving Vincent (Altitude), The Shape Of Water (Fox), On Chesil Beach (Lionsgate), and Breathe (STX).

MMSouth

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Re: Loving Vincent
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2017, 10:55:17 AM »
Loving Vincent has been selected for main competition at the Polish Film Festival, 18 - 23 September.  It’s also to be the opening film at the festival.  Not so surprising given that the film has strong Polish links, eg director Dorota Kobiela.

MarkRoick

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Re: Loving Vincent
« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2017, 03:42:47 PM »
I would say it's good news that this event has expanded to two days. I don't know a huge amount about distribution, but this kind of event seems to be very much like a marketplace. Distributors show off their wares, exhibitors decide whether it's worth screening them in their theatres. And with LV and OCB on this list it can only be a good thing for us here!
“You need to do what’s right for you and what your instinct is telling you to do, because only then, I think, you can be the best version of yourself.” - Saoirse

MarkRoick

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Re: Loving Vincent
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2017, 08:40:05 AM »
Loving Vincent to premiere in the UK at the BFI London Film Festival!

Quote
The 61st BFI London Film Festival in partnership with American Express is delighted to announce the UK premiere of Loving Vincent. Broadcast live from the National Gallery on Monday 9 October, audiences in cinemas across the country are invited to experience the film premiere and the following Q&A with special guests. Tickets go on-sale from Wednesday 23 August at LovingVincent.Film.

This is the same festival where Brooklyn had its UK premiere, and where Saoirse gave a Screen Talk about her work, in 2015. I wonder if there will be screenings of OCB or LB too?

“You need to do what’s right for you and what your instinct is telling you to do, because only then, I think, you can be the best version of yourself.” - Saoirse

MMSouth

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Re: Loving Vincent
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2017, 09:27:25 AM »
There may a decent chance of Saoirse attending the Loving Vincent Premiere at London Film Festival, especially if OCB and/or Lady Bird also feature at the same festival.  Saoirse could well be in London at that time or possibly back home in Dublin.  (If SITB production has commenced by early October it would probably be rehearsals etc which would most likely be held in London.)  Hope it doesn’t clash with the Lady Bird screening at NYFF.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2017, 09:33:36 AM by MMSouth »

trvscrosley

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Re: Loving Vincent
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2017, 08:24:01 PM »

I didn't know her part was much more than a simple side character! I'm so happy this is making the rounds along with her other 2 films.

CountJohn

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Re: Loving Vincent
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2017, 09:24:21 PM »
Good to hear we'll be seeing a lot of her oil painted avatar in the movie. This is starting to sound like it could be a really great film, like On Chesil Beach.

jlent

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Re: Loving Vincent
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2017, 07:29:17 PM »
After the tons of posts we've given to Lady Bird and the several on On Chesil Beach I'm quite surprised there's been nothing about Loving Vincent, which played at Telluride. I couldn't find much by searching the Internet either. I found this:
Quote
TELLURIDE —  “I loved ‘Loving Vincent,’ ” the woman said, her cheeks flushed. “It was just so beautiful.”
She was talking about the first feature film to be entirely painted, which screened at the 44th Telluride Film Festival. It wasn’t the lemon drop cocktail the bartender had just shaken and placed before her. For 35 years, she’s headed to one of the nation’s most glorious locations to attend a festival that continues to demand and nurture an abiding love of film.

That was the very first line of the following article. But the movie is not mentioned again except for one photo. (There is also a photo of Saoirse from Lady Bird I had not seen before)
http://theknow.denverpost.com/2017/09/07/telluride-film-festival-2017-films/157731/


Found three reviews.  Variety's Peter DeBruge calls it "the truly awe-inspiring portrait of the great Dutch artist"

The only mention of Saoirse also gives a sense of  the plot:
Quote
The resulting portrait playfully reinterprets the idea of Impressionism, synthesizing the often contradictory angles from which his acquaintances saw the artist (or vice versa) into a kind of composite that ranges from the wild, fantastic colors used to capture paint supplier Pere Tanguy (John Sessions) to the delicate pastels he used to render the enigmatic young Marguerite (Saoirse Ronan), daughter of Doctor Gachet (Jerome Flynn), the man Armand is most desperate to interview. (Actor Bill Thomas plays another physician, the borderline-silly Dr. Mazery, who introduces biographers Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith’s controversial theory that someone else shot van Gogh.)

Complete review:
http://variety.com/2017/film/reviews/loving-vincent-review-van-gogh-1202469734/

But one critic, David Ehrlich, who loved Lady Bird - so did DeBruge - gives LV a B-.
Quote
The film isn’t just presented in the style of van Gogh’s paintings; on the contrary, it fulfills Albinus’ dream by seamlessly stitching 94 of the paintings into the action. As a result, most of the scenes are written and structured in order to accommodate as many of these reference points as possible — even Lars von Trier would chafe at such a ridiculous obstruction.
Kobiela and Welchman arrive at all sorts of clever solutions to this problem, but they’re never able to solve it completely. They’re never able to dramatize the very 19th century question of how a man can go from calm to suicidal in just six weeks, and the movie only feels more disjointed as it digs its way toward some kind of truth.

Saoirse is mentioned once:
Quote
Recognizable actors like Saoirse Ronan and Chris O’Dowd (playing Armand’s postman father) may have been necessary to get this thing funded, and the weight of their voices helps ground the story in a human place, but it’s hard to sustain the illusion when Bronn from “Game of Thrones” (Jerome Flynn) saunters through one of van Gogh’s masterpieces.

But he doesn't completely hate it:
Quote
Still, there’s something ineffably beautiful about such a purehearted folly, even if a Herzogian drama about the making of “Loving Vincent” might have more to offer than the film does itself. All art requires a bit of madness, and all cinema even more so. Not every delirious vision is worth seeing through, but we’d be lost if not for the people who are still willing to learn that lesson the hard way.

Review here:
http://www.indiewire.com/2017/08/loving-vincent-review-oil-painted-vincent-van-gogh-1201871551/


The third review was a fan review, very favorable, but I can't find it now, so that's that.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2017, 07:37:02 PM by jlent »

jlent

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Re: Loving Vincent
« Reply #11 on: September 21, 2017, 04:54:44 PM »
Here's a clip with Saoirse.
https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/loving-vincent-exclusive-scene-oscar-hopeful-saoirse-ronan-gets-van-gogh-makoever-170149969.html

Loving Vincent opens tomorrow at Lincoln Plaza Cinema in New York. Review is out from The New York Times. A.O.Scott.
Not even a mention of Saoirse. I think there might be a lot of reviews like this one:

“Loving Vincent” addresses its subject, the Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh, with two what-ifs — one marvelous and fantastical, the other empirical and pedestrian. What if his paintings, with their wild colors and vibrant brush strokes, had been able to move? And what if the bullet that killed him had been fired by someone else?

A long and arduous labor of love by Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman, the film turns van Gogh’s work into an unusual kind of biopic. Using tens of thousands of oil paintings commissioned from scores of artists, the filmmakers transform famous works of modern art into a hypnotic and beguiling cartoon. The people van Gogh rendered on canvas — the provincial French functionaries, doctors, barmaids and farmers immortalized on museum walls — are brought to uncanny life, with the voices of professional actors, some of them well known.

They participate in a meandering detective story. Armand Roulin (Douglas Booth), the layabout son of a village postmaster (Chris O’Dowd), is instructed by his father to deliver a letter to Vincent’s brother Theo. Armand travels to Paris and then to Auvers-sur-Oise, the northern French town where Vincent died, leaving behind contradictory memories among the people he painted in his final years. They recall a passionate, hard-working artist, but not always the tormented, suicidal genius of legend.

That legend has been sustained by earlier movies, notably Vincente Minnelli’s rumbustious “Lust for Life” (with Kirk Douglas as van Gogh) and Robert Altman’s more cerebral “Vincent & Theo” (starring Tim Roth and Paul Rhys as the brothers).

Vincent himself (Robert Gulaczyk) is a more elusive presence in “Loving Vincent,” since most of its action is posthumous and self-portraits make up a relatively small part of his oeuvre. There are flashbacks, but the painter is evoked mainly through the dialogue of the other characters, as if he were the Maltese Falcon.

The principal mystery is the stuff of police procedural, as Armand doggedly tries to reconstruct van Gogh’s final weeks and shed light on the circumstances of his death. How miserable was he, and why? What secrets did he harbor? What enemies had he made?

The questions are interesting, but not quite sufficiently dramatized to sustain “Loving Vincent” for its full length. As the story limps and drags, the viewer also becomes accustomed to the images, and astonishment at the film’s innovative, painstaking technique begins to fade. But its charm never quite wears off, for reasons summed up in the title.


« Last Edit: September 21, 2017, 05:46:30 PM by jlent »

Steve 7216

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Re: Loving Vincent
« Reply #12 on: September 21, 2017, 10:49:06 PM »
It is still a worthwhile project despite issues with the narrative as some critics have pointed out during the last few weeks.  It's a great labor of love.