Saoirse talks to IO Donna

Saoirse is featured on IO Donna, a renowed Italian magazine. Unfortunately for me, my italian is pretty tragic, but I did make an attempt at translating the article, and you can read it below. I apologize for any mistakes and would very much welcome corrections.

Our gallery has also been updated with the photoshoot featured on the article.

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It is almost impossible for the actors to inspire tenderness outside a film set. The better they are, the greater the mistrust. But in the presence of Saoirse Ronan who, with genuine triumphalism, reveals: “Yesterday I got my license!” Not even the experienced reporter can prevent solidarity. And the feeling is that the 25 year old Irishwoman who received her first Oscar nomination when she was 13 (for Atonement, which was followed by two others) had a great desire to tell the world she grew up.

The condition of a child prodigy (and she is a prodigious child too), even if perhaps it is no longer as dangerous as it used to be, it is certainly uncomfortable. There is always someone ready to remind you of the stories that ended badly, the talents that disappeared, those in conflict with their parents, those unable to make the transition. Macaulay Culkin will forever be the child from “Home Alone”, while Jodie Foster still represents, at 56, the happy outcome. Saoirse, beyond the exoticism of the name (meaning “freedom”, which was very popular in the 1920s and was pronounced “Serscia”), is keen to let people know that she lives a fairly normal life. She works in Europe and America and rests in the Irish countryside, which she never misses an opportunity to exalt for its beauty and thaumaturgical properties on the body and the spirit.

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Saoirse covers Harper’s Bazaar UK

Saoirse is in the February cover of Harper’s Bazaar UK! She talked to Erica Wagner about British monarchs, Irish borders and whether history will repeat itself in the age of Brexit. The featured images, as well as the cover, have been added to our photo gallery. You can read the article below!

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Saoirse Ronan on British monarchs, Irish borders and Mary Queen of Scots

She was the Queen who might have been. Mary Stuart was the daughter of James V of Scotland and his French wife, Mary of Guise; born in 1542, her charm, beauty and education made her as remarkable a figure as England’s Elizabeth I and indeed, as the great-niece of Henry VIII, there were those who thought her the legitimate heir to the English throne. It is the rivalry between these two women that is the focus of Josie Rourke’s captivating film Mary Queen of Scots – the eponymous heroine embodied by Saoirse Ronan, and Elizabeth by Margot Robbie. Now, on a sunny Sunday morning in Massachusetts, Ronan and I are chatting about the film – and much else besides – though the woman before me seems far from the regal figure I’ve seen onscreen, in a thick cardigan and candy-striped pyjama bottoms. It’s her one day off a week from filming Greta Gerwig’s second directorial outing, an adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women. She’s curled up on the sofa, nursing a cold and sipping tea through a straw, but her conversation is lively, funny, warm; and as soon as I’m in her presence I feel as if we’ve known each other for years.

The conflict between Mary Stuart and Elizabeth I would, as we know, eventually lead to Mary’s execution. Rourke’s film is a depiction of the balance of power between them: in a certain sense it’s almost incidental that both are women. ‘The interesting thing is that they’re so similar in many ways,’ says Ronan. ‘The rivalry is almost created by the
lords and advisors around them. They used to write to each other all the time, and we
have a scene in the film where Mary says of Elizabeth, “Nobody understands my situation except her.” I think that’s an interesting thing to see in a political drama, that you’ve got these two people who have been turned into enemies by the people around them, but really they are sisters first and foremost. There’s an incredible strength that comes from acknowledging that.’

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Saoirse talks to The Wall Street Journal

Saoirse talked to The Wall Street Journal in order to promote “Mary Queen of Scots”! Two images were released with the article, and they were added to our photo gallery. You can read the complete text below.

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Saoirse Ronan Would Rather Be Knitting
The ascendant star, now playing ‘Mary Queen of Scots,’ prefers to spend her off-time out of the limelight—and get through the grocery store incognito

With star turns in last year’s “Lady Bird” and the new period epic “Mary Queen of Scots,” out Dec. 7, the Irish actress Saoirse Ronan has catapulted into Hollywood’s top ranks. But she prefers to spend her off time out of the limelight: The 24-year-old’s favorite pastimes include knitting, cooking and reading history. “I don’t go to a lot of clubs because I’m busy knitting,” she jokes. “I just knit and read history books.” She laughs and shakes her head, adding, “Now nobody will want to read this interview.”

Ms. Ronan’s interest in history won’t come as a surprise to those who have followed her career. Her breakout role, as a teen whose lie wreaks havoc in “Atonement” (2007), was set largely in 1930s and ’40s England. In “Brooklyn” (2015), she played an Irish immigrant in 1950s New York who’s pulled between her homeland and her new life. She’s now filming “Little Women,” playing Jo March in the movie based on Louisa May Alcott’s 19th-century classic.

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Saoirse covers Vogue

Saoirse is on the August cover of VOGUE! This marks the beginning of the promotion for the film Mary, Queen of Scots, one most of us have been waiting for literally years. A brand new, stunning photoshoot by Jamie Hawkesworth was released along with the article on the magazine’s website. The images have been added to our gallery, and you can read Saoirse’s cover story below.

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Saoirse Ronan is describing the aftermath of her first acting job. “I went into this melancholic state for a few weeks,” she tells me. “I remember sitting on the bed with Mam next to me, and I was like: ‘I’m never going to have that experience again.’ ” The community that had come together on set and developed real bonds had now permanently dispersed. “It was that thought: That exact crew will never work together again. Never.” The project was an Irish television drama called The Clinic. When she appeared on it, Ronan was nine years old.

Now 24, Ronan has come to meet me in a coastal Irish town on a sunny afternoon in May. Ireland is facing a referendum to repeal its ban on abortion, and lurid posters of fetuses are everywhere. Ronan recently appeared in a video supporting the reproductive rights campaign—a long-growing grassroots movement that finally succeeded in pressuring the government to hold a referendum—and everyone is talking about it. In the café where we pick up lunch, we fall into conversation with our server about the upcoming vote.

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“Lady Bird” covers Entertainment Weekly

Saoirse, Laurie Metcalf and Greta Gerwig are on the cover of Entertainment Weekly‘s Oscars issue! Buy it here to read the complete article and their Academy Awards guide. You can read an excerpt below, and the featured photoshoot has been added to our photo gallery.

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There’s just something about Greta Gerwig’s Lady Bird. Audiences’ love affair with the coming-of-age tale began at the Telluride Film Festival, where attendees were first charmed by this sharp, vivid, witty, and poignant story of a teenage girl (Saoirse Ronan) who is restless to leave her family home in Sacramento, California, for something bigger and better. What that exactly is, she’s not sure, but she’s convinced that it’s happening just beyond her reach. Her clashes with her mother (Laurie Metcalf), her relationship with her father (Tracy Letts), her intense friendship with her best friend (Beanie Feldstein), and her crushes (Lucas Hedges and Timothée Chalamet) are all achingly relatable.

The Academy certainly agrees — earlier this week, Lady Bird racked up five Oscar nominations including Best Picture, Best Actress for Ronan, and Best Supporting Actress for Metcalf. Gerwig’s screenplay got a nod and she became just the fifth woman in Oscar’s 90-year history to crack Best Director (for her solo directorial debut, no less).

“I felt it from the very beginning,” says Gerwig of the hard-to-put-your-finger-on-it magic that surrounds this film. “You start getting the feeling that the movie wants to exist. That sounds a little goofy, but that’s what it feels like.”

Entertainment Weekly sat down with Gerwig, Ronan, and Metcalf, where it quickly became clear the warm feelings that are so apparent in front of the camera, exist behind the scenes, too. “Don’t take this the wrong way,” Ronan says, turning to Gerwig. “But I don’t see you, like, as a female director. I just think of you as a great director. A great filmmaker. I think the reason why the set was run so well is that Greta’s a great leader.” Echoes Metcalf, “We trusted Greta so much. We knew [Gerwig] was looking for the heart of it, and that you’ve always got your eye on the big picture.”

Saoirse and Greta Gerwig cover Variety

Saoirse and Greta Gerwig are on the 1st Variety cover of 2018! The magazine features an interview with the pair about Lady Bird, which is already on their website and you can read below.

Greta Gerwig and Saoirse Ronan on How They Found the Voice of ‘Lady Bird’

Greta Gerwig is having coffee and a bowl of jasmine rice in a mostly empty SoHo restaurant on a frosty late afternoon in December. The day before, she was named best director by the National Board of Review, the first of many accolades that she, her star Saoirse Ronan and their movie “Lady Bird” will receive in the coming weeks. Gerwig is beaming, though you get the feeling that’s her natural state. Her short hair is blondish, with dark roots, and you can see an echo of a number of the characters she’s played — the ebullient falling-through-the-cracks dancer of “Frances Ha,” the Bowie-headed art punk of “20th Century Women” — in her large sun-dazed smile, her easy open laugh, her tossed-off intelligence.

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Saoirse talks to TIME

Saoirse has recently talked to TIME Magazine about her career and her current work in the play ‘The Crucible’ – she describes her character, Abigail, and her motivations, stating she believes it is important for her to play intelligent women, “because I think in art, you have a responsibility to portray real life”. A new beautiful photo was released along with the article, which you can see/read below.

Saoirse RonanIt’s two hours before the curtain goes up, and Saoirse Ronan is making a cup of tea in her cramped dressing room. She offers me a cup, though thankfully not the “gross” licorice-flavored kind Ronan is drinking to revive her voice before she takes the Broadway stage as Abigail, the manipulative maid at the heart of Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible. As the Irish actor, whose name is pronounced “Ser-sha,” searches for her favorite green mug, we discuss how Abigail is traditionally played as a teenage seductress who beguiles the noble John Proctor. When the older man later casts out Abigail, she brings the 17th century Massachusetts town of Salem to its knees by accusing Proctor’s wife and others of witchcraft.

At least that’s the way U.S. schools usually teach it, I tell her. “I bet it was a male teacher who told you she was the villain,” she jokes in reply. To Ronan, Abigail is more victim than victimizer. “She’s usually played quite vampy and sexual and all that. I wasn’t going to do that. I just thought she’s a 17-year-old, quite precocious, very smart. But she’s hormonal and emotional because she’s 17, and this older man gives her time and attention. As far as she’s concerned, he’s in love with her, she’s in love with him, and she’ll do anything for them to be together,” she says. “And I respect that actually. ”

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(Photo) Saoirse for VOGUE Magazine

Saoirse and her The Crucible co-star Ben Whishaw are featured in a new editorial for this month’s Vogue issue. We have attached the new photo and interview below.

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Saoirse Ronan and Ben Whishaw Bring New Dimension to The Crucible
by ADAM GREEN

If you are in the market for revelatory—and pulse-quickening—productions of plays that you thought you knew all too well, then the Belgian director Ivo van Hove is your man. On the heels of his devastating staging of Arthur Miller’s A View from the Bridge, van Hove returns to Broadway this month with his take on The Crucible, Miller’s thinly veiled allegory about the 1950s Communist witch hunts, set against the actual 1690s Salem witch hunts, featuring music by Philip Glass and an A-plus cast led by Ben Whishaw and, making her professional stage debut, Saoirse Ronan.
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