Saoirse Makes Forbes’ 30 Under 30 List

Saoirse has landed a spot on Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list in the Hollywood & Entertainment category, following her turn in ‘Brooklyn’. The annual list highlights “young entrepreneurs, breakout talents, and change agents in 20 different sectors”. Here is Forbes’ write-up:

Saoirse Ronan, 21
Actor

Saoirse Ronan, known for her roles in “Atonement” and “The Lovely Bones” has set critics fluttering with ‘Brooklyn’, which many will expect will earn her a second Oscar nomination. The Irish-born Ronan makes her Broadway debut as Abigail Williams in “The Crucible” in 2016.

Saoirse talks to The Envelope

Saoirse and a very talented group of actresses gathered earlier this month to talk with The Envelope about their films, their personal approaches to work, and their industry. Participating in the conversation were Cate Blanchett, Brie Larson, Helen Mirren, Charlotte Rampling and Lily Tomlin. A beautiful new portrait of Saoirse was released along with the article, and you can view it here.

Here are edited excerpts from the free-flowing conversation moderated by Times film writers Rebecca Keegan and Mark Olsen in which the actresses discuss the roles that hit too close to home, the secret alchemy of working with directors and how they know when to say “no.”

Keegan: Helen, you recently played gossip columnist Hedda Hopper in “Trumbo.” We’re in the L.A. Times building, which is where she worked. How do you think she would handle an actors roundtable?

Mirren: She’d certainly be wearing a hat … the difference would be that none of us would be relaxed because we would know that we had to obey not just what Hedda was requiring of us, but what our studios were requiring of us. I presume we’re all much, much freer than any of those actresses.

Blanchett: No, I was bought many, many years ago. Cheaply. 50 cents.

Keegan: It seems like there is more of an expectation of actors to share of their personal lives now, perhaps, than there was then. Saoirse, how do you strike that balance between wanting to be able to preserve something for yourself and also share a little bit of who you are?

Ronan: I started when I was very young. Even from the age of 12, the only thing that was important was actually the film, and that was the only thing that I was ever going to talk about. Naturally, as actors, we’re very, very open, we’re very emotional and so it’s easier to kind of be expressive…. But for me it’s important to protect my life outside of work.

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Saoirse talks to USA Today

Saoirse has recently talked to USA Today about her upcoming film, ‘Brooklyn’, in which she played her first Irish character. We have updated our photo gallery with a photo session that was releasedwith the article, and you can watch her interview below.

Saoirse RonanSaoirse RonanSaoirse RonanSaoirse Ronan

NEW YORK — Until Brooklyn, Saoirse Ronan had never played an Irish character in a movie. But what could seem like a major casting oversight is actually no coincidence.

“There’s a phrase back at home, when something is ‘diddly idle,’ ” says Ronan, 21, with a grin. “That’s when someone tries to do this stereotypical Irish film, where everyone’s a farmer and we’ve never seen the big city.

“We’ve done that and seen that and most of the time, it feels quite flat,” she adds. “So I was waiting for something like this to come along.”

In the 1950s-set Brooklyn (opens Wednesday in New York and Los Angeles, before expanding nationwide Nov. 25), Ronan plays a young Irish woman named Eilis Lacey whose older sister, Rose, arranges for her to move to New York in hopes of finding better opportunities. Taking a job at a department store, enrolling in night class and falling for a sweet Italian boy, Tony (Emory Cohen), Eilis overcomes homesickness and embraces her city life — that is, until she’s called back to Ireland under grave circumstances, and must choose between her two homes and suitors (Domhnall Gleeson, as Irish beau Jim, who falls for her when she returns).

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Saoirse talks about ‘Star Wars’

In a fun new article posted by The New York times, several artists talk about their first time watching ‘Star Wars’, including Saoirse – who, incidentally, autidioned for Episode VII. Read her experience below.

Saoirse RonanMy friend Bill as a boy loved it. I had seen the newer ones, and you know [screws up face], so I thought that’s what “Star Wars” was. He sat me down and said no, no, no, no, no, you have no idea how brilliant this is. So I watched it for the first time [two months ago]. It was so beautiful — I loved it. And I cried when I saw Yoda. Hormones, hormones and “Star Wars.” That’s why children should watch “Star Wars” and not 21-year-old women, because you get very maternal toward Yoda. Super-maternal. I don’t care [that he is hundreds of years old]! He was so wise, but he looked after so many people. Someone needed to take care of him. And then he dies, and he passed on all this wisdom to Luke. Oh my God, I’m going to go watch it again.

(Photos) Saoirse for Backstage Magazine

Saoirse has recently spoken to Backstage magazine about ‘Brooklyn’, and the article has just been released. Our gallery was updated with a photoshoot featured in the issue, and you can read her interview below.

Saoirse RonanSaoirse RonanSaoirse RonanSaoirse Ronan

Eilis Lacey is a girl on the cusp of womanhood in “Brooklyn,” director John Crowley’s adaptation of Colm Tóibín’s 2009 novel. Leaving behind her rural hometown in Ireland, Eilis is heading into an uncertain future in 1950s New York. And though the period setting might seem distancing, the story of growth and the nature of home spoke directly to star Saoirse Ronan.

“As you leave home, you’re never able to take that step back,” Ronan says. “The realization that I had is that no matter what, once you have an experience that is separate from your home life and from your family and where you grew up, you will never be the same again. You will never be the person that you’d have been had you stayed.”

Sitting over hors d’oeuvres at Manhattan’s Crosby Street Hotel, Ronan is referring not only to screenwriter Nick Hornby’s script (which charts Eilis’ move to Brooklyn; her first love; and her return to Ireland upon a family member’s death), but also to her own life. When Crowley first approached her about the role several years ago, Ronan was in the midst of planning a permanent move from her parents’ house in Dublin to London. Much like Eilis’ emigration to Brooklyn, Ronan’s move to London was her unequivocal leap into independence and adulthood—one she made just before filming “Brooklyn.”

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Saoirse talks to The Telegraph

The Telegraph has published a great article about Saoirse on their website, celebrating her career and her latest sucess in ‘Brooklyn’. Read it below.

Saoirse RonanSaoirse Ronan has beautiful pale-blue eyes. Every director she has worked with has chosen to focus on this at some point, because they express so much. As Ian McEwan said of her breakthrough role in the film of his novel Atonement, ‘She gives us thought processes right on screen, even before she speaks, and conveys so much with her eyes.’ Which makes it all the more distressing when, during our meeting, they suddenly fill with tears.

I am telling her how much I enjoyed her latest film, Brooklyn, which went to Sundance Film Festival early this year as a small indie vying for attention and came out as an Oscar contender. Ronan ends up apologising for getting emotional. ‘I’ve never worked as hard as that, and I definitely needed a bit of emotional support because it’s too close to home,’ she says.

‘For people to respond to it as well as they have – I have to say it’s a dream.’ She has not seen the film, she admits later. ‘I can’t. Just talking about it, you can see I’m a basket case. In a couple of years, or when I have kids or something, we’ll all sit and watch it together.’

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Saoirse Ronan ‘absolutely extraordinary’ in Brooklyn lead role – author Colm Toibin

Oscar-nominee Saoirse Ronan has been described as “absolutely extraordinary” in her new role in Brooklyn by the man who penned the book.

The acclaimed actress (20) has finished filming on the movie based on the novel of the same name by award-winning Irish author Colm Toibin.

Co-starring Domhnall Gleeson, it tells the story of a young woman named Eilis who moves from a rural town in Ireland to the bright lights of Brooklyn as she tries to follow her dreams. Once in the US, Eilis is initially homesick, but soon settles down in the city and falls in love with an Italian plumber called Tony, who is played by Emory Cohen.

And having seen the first version of the movie, which saw Nick Hornby writing the screenplay, Toibin was left singing the praises of the Carlow native.

“It’s very, very emotional. It’s the first time I suppose she’s doing a part as a lead actress as an adult on her own and she’s absolutely extraordinary,” he said. “I thought, maybe this is for people who remember emigration but all the young people who came from the publishers and agency in London, they were all in tears of the choice she had to make. Was she going to stay in Ireland or was she going to go back to Brooklyn and the guy, the American actor Emory Cohen plays it as pure charm. He’ll do anything to win her.”

He also said there was wonderful chemistry between her and the ‘Stars Wars’ actor, who’s quickly becoming the toast of Hollywood and plays Saoirse’s love interest in the film.

“Domhnall Gleeson in Ireland plays it the other way around (to Cohen). He is just so sincere, so honest, so decent that he would mean pure stability and he sort of needs her and she can see that every word he says is true. So they’re playing the opposite ways against each other and she has to decide which way to go,”
Toibin told Newstalk’s Pat Kenny.

The cast also includes Jim Broadbent as the village priest and Julie Waters as Ronan’s mum with the production shot in locations including Enniscorthy in Wexford and Dublin.

Set in 1950’s Ireland, the shoot then moved on to Montreal in Canada with the movie scheduled for release in early 2015 with Toibin saying the only thing left to do is add the music score to the film.

Author Toibin will shortly publish his eight novel, which is entitled Nora Webster.

(Source: Independent.ie)